Nouns Say “What’s That?” by Michael Dahl

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Pages: 32

Publisher: Capstone Publishing

Published: August 1, 2019

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

NetGalley:

Tour groups, exhibits, paintings, sculptures … The museum is teeming with common and proper nouns, everywhere you look! Person, Place, and Thing make sure readers not only discover factual grammar basics inside, but also lots of fun, laughter, and adventure.

My Review:

As a substitute teacher, I LOVE this book. It is easy and fun to read with colorful eye-catching characters. I loved the fact that each noun (person, place, or thing) was assigned a color so when that type of noun was mentioned you knew which noun was being discussed.

I am already excited to order this book for myself and my teacher friends. The littles are going to love it. This would be the perfect book for families to read-aloud together to teach and learn nouns.

I received a complimentary copy from the publisher, Capstone Publishing, through NetGalley. Any and all opinions expressed in the above review are entirely my own.

 

 

Crunch and Crack, Oink and Whack! An Onomatopeia Story by Brian P. Cleary

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Pages: 32

Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group

Published: January 1, 2019

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

NetGalley:
The rhyming verse from Brian P. Cleary presents the fictional Clip-Clop Elementary School’s celebration of “Onomatopoeia Day.” Enthusiastic young students make their way from band room (Rattle! Boom! Twang!) to the gym (Whiff! Whack! Swish!) to the science lab (Hiss! Spurt! Ding!) and beyond. Brief back matter offers additional examples of onomatopoeias—words that imitate sounds.

My Review:
One of the best educational books in print to introduce young readers to the world of Onomatopoeia. The illustrations are colorful and fit the text perfectly. I adored that the story took place in a classroom setting. I feel it will help young students to learn how fun school can be if they just look around and think about the different ways to learn. Listen to the sounds of the mechanics around you.

The ending of the book is a treasure for teachers. The author has listed to words by categories of animal noises, human noises, and mechanical noises. It would be the perfect reference/anchor chart for the classroom.

I see this as a great Christmas present for my teacher friends.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from Lerner Publishing Group through NetGalley. Any and all opinions expressed in the above review are entirely my own.