A Bidder End (Antiques and Collectibles #7) by Ellery Adams and Parker Riggs

bidder

Pages: 151

Publisher: Beyond the Page

Published: March 7, 2019

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

NetGalley
When a retired Hollywood A-lister decides to auction off part of his enviable collection of antiques, reporter Molly Appleby is thrilled to be covering the event for Collector’s Weekly, and she’s certain it will secure the reputation of the dealer handling it, a friend of hers. But soon after the final gavel comes down, the actor’s secretary vanishes and the antique dealer is found dead, apparently having taken his own life. Molly’s not sold on the coroner’s verdict of suicide, though, and she can’t help but start digging for clues to what she suspects is foul play.
As she begins to delve into the private life of her friend and his connections with the actor’s staff, Molly slowly discovers that the dealer was far more unscrupulous than she ever imagined and that nearly everyone who knew him had a motive for murder. And when another body turns up and the devious killer begins leaving mysterious clues to taunt Molly and the police, Molly finds herself facing a cunning culprit who wants to see her going, going, gone . . .

My Review
I do believe Ellery Adams could write a book on accounting and I would find it an amazing read. I have yet to be disappointed in any of her books. I am definitely interested in researching other books by Parker Riggs.

I have only read the first book in the Antiques & Collectibles Mystery Series but was able to pick right up with book 7. That right there shows the true talent of an amazing author. I never once felt lost or confused.

A Bidder End was full of twists and turns that keep me interested right up until the last page. A bonus is learning about the antique and collectible world. I will be moving this series right up my TBR pile so I’ll be ready for book 8.

I received a complimentary copy from Beyond the Page Publishing through NetGalley. Any and all opinions expressed in the above review are entirely my own.

Death Threads (A Southern Sewing Circle #2) by Elizabeth Lynn Casey (aka Laura Bradford)

death

Pages: 288

Publisher: Berkley

Published: May 5, 2010

Rating: 4 stars

Goodreads:
Yankee librarian Tori Sinclair is basking in the warmth of her new circle of friends from South Carolina’s Sweet Briar Ladies Society sewing circle. That is until local author Colby Calhoun reveals an unflattering secret about the town’s historic past-and then disappears, leaving a bloody trail behind him. And when Tori begins to see a pattern of the townsfolk’s age-old Southern pride standing in the way of justice, she knows it’s time to unravel the mystery.

My review:
This series is for fans of anything Southern and book related. You cannot get more perfect than a library set in South Carolina. If you add in the love for Little House (Laura Ingalls Wilder) that Tori has then we have the winning trifecta in my humble opinion.

I am not a person who views sewing as relaxing. I am more in the ranks of our dear sweet Leona who along with her twin sister is a hoot. You will find yourself chuckling quite frequently while reading. The idea of the handsewn library book bags for nursing home residents has really touched my heart. My mom is currently in a long term rehabilitation to get her leg strength back and seeing the nursing home part of the rehab center is so sad. I wish more public libraries had the capability to make sure nursing home residents had access to books.

A part of me wants to gobble this series up as quickly as I can read but the smart part of me is telling myself to slow down since there are only 12 books in this wonderful series and I have already read two. I am limiting myself to one book a month in this series.

The Family Tree Problem Solver Tried-and-True Tactics for Tracing Elusive Ancestors 3rd Edition by Marsha Hoffman Rising

family

Publisher: F + W Media and Family Tree Books

Published: March 19, 2019

Rating: 3 stars

NetGalley:
Has your family history research hit a brick wall? Marsha Hoffman Rising’s newly updated bestselling book The Family Tree Problem Solver has the solutions to help you find the answers you seek. Here, you’ll find answers to genealogy’s toughest problems.

Inside, you’ll find: Workarounds for lost or destroyed recordsTechniques for finding ancestors with common namesStrategies for analyzing your problem and creating a successful research planIdeas on how to find vital records before civil registrationTroubleshooting advice for interpreting your DNA resultsTips for finding “missing” ancestors in censusesInstructions for investigating collateral kin to further your family treeMethods for finding ancestors who lived before 1850Case studies that show you how to apply these strategies to real-life research problems.

My review:

I found this book helpful but overwhelming at times. Some of the examples were very hard to follow and I found myself skipping over them. I’m one of the researchers of her own family tree that has hit a wall due to no records because of fire and flood of courthouses plus the spelling of my maiden name (Brocato) has been spelled very many ways. I will be using techniques learned in this book to try and get farther in my research.

This book can be very helpful but is not one to be used for new researchers. I think they may get overwhelmed and frustrated very easily. I would suggest reading after you have researched regularly for a couple of years.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from F + W Media and Family Tree Books through NetGalley. Any and all opinions expressed in the above review is entirely my own.